Google’s new privacy policy sparks controversy around the world

Google’s official blog yesterday posted a controversial announcement about its new privacy policy that takes effect immediately.

The policy indicates that Google will put all its products under a unified privacy umbrella, and user information will be shared among Google’s products once the user has signed into a Google account. Due to the implementation of the new policy, for example, videos people watch on YouTube will help decide which kinds of ads appear in their Gmail.

Google will likely have more run-ins outside the United States, as its new privacy policy doesn’t meet the standard of France’s privacy watchdog CNIL. The group wrote to Google earlier this week, asking it to revise the policy. Japan’s trade and industrial ministry also warned that Google must obey Japanese privacy law while putting its privacy policy into use, Reuters reported.
The online giant has explained that it does not view the changes as cause for concern.

“We aren’t collecting any new or additional information about users. We won’t be selling your personal data. And we will continue to employ industry-leading security to keep your information safe.” wrote for the Official Google Blog.

Despite Google’s explanation,the new policy links all of the company’s platforms together to create user profiles it can use to sell targeted advertisements and customize search results.”
Google is putting advertiser’s interests before user privacy and should not be rushing ahead before the public understand what the changes will mean,
The Christian Science Monitor offered methods for avoiding Google tracking users’ information. Logging out before using Google’s search engine or completing tasks with different providers is one way, the article stated.
Although logging out of a Google account may affect Google monitoring personal information, the search engine can still collect anonymous data from users’ activities. Logging in and out is also inconvenient.


Image: ifanr

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