Twitter’s mobile users are a key resource for advertisers, it says

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If you thought 2012 was all atwitter with Tweets, 2013 may be poised to be the year that Twitter hits its sweet spot for mobile advertising.


Twitter recently released statistics on its advertising blog from a study conducted by digital intelligence provider Kantar Media Compete that highlights how mobile Twitter users are prime targets for advertisers due to their Twitter habits. 

Compete reflected that the average Twitter follower monitors five or more brands, but mobile Twitter users are 60% more likely to follow 11 or more brands and 53% more likely to remember an ad on Twitter than the average user.

Particularly noteworthy for advertising strategists, the study found that primary mobile users are also 44% more likely to click on links, 66% more likely to re-Tweet and 76% more likely to “favorite” a Tweet.

According to the study, users who primarily access Twitter via mobile are 79% more likely to be on Twitter several times a day than the average Twitter user.  They are twice as likely to access Twitter before bed and upon wake-up.  Primary mobile users are 181% more likely to use Twitter during their commutes, and 119% more likely to continue to access Twitter once at school or work.  

If you consider Twitter merely a convenient diversion from daily responsibility, you may be surprised that it is just as popular with mobile users in social hours:  Mobile Twitter users are 127% more likely than other Twitter users to use access the app when out with friends, 202% more likely to use Twitter before and after a movie, and three times more likely to do so while shopping.  There’s also the figure that 57% of mobile Twitter users communicate with people near them via Twitter—i.e. they are consumers ripe for contagious, local-based consumption.

Twitter tallies all of these numbers to tell advertisers that Twitter’s mobile followers not only exponentially multiply eyeballs to any one particular point, they have the potential to exponentially drive eyeballs to particular brands—“ to create reach, build frequency and drive engagement.”

 i.e.  Twitter seems to be practically shouting from the Twitter-sphere that it should be showered with more advertising dollars and ingenuity.  It’s still early in 2013, but here’s a trend—potentially a self-generated one—to watch for.

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